Welcome to the North Carolina Humanities Council

Since 1972 the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has made the humanities a comerstone of public life. Take a look at what the Humanities Council offers your community, use the calendar to locate an event, consider applying for a grant, or contact the staff to find out where and how the Council is at work across the state.

Dr. Anne Firor Scott, a W.K. Boyd Professor of History Emerita at Duke University, and the 1994 winner of the John Tyler Caldwell Award for the Humanities, which is the highest honor given by the North Carolina Humanities Council, is one of the 10 winners that will be honored with the 2013 National Humanities Medal awarded for outstanding achievements in history, cultural studies, filmmaking, cultural commentary, and historic preservation presented by President Barack Obama.

Dr. Peter Caulfield, professor of Language and Literature at UNC Asheville, served on the board of trustees of the North Carolina Humanities Council from 1998–2004. More recently, Caulfield has served as facilitator for the Humanities Council's Literature & Medicine program at the Charles George VA Medical Center in Asheville, guiding literature discussions among VA healthcare professionals.

The North Carolina Humanities Council invites original entries of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry for the 2014 Linda Flowers Literary Award. The postmark deadline for submissions is July 15, 2014. There is no entry fee.

The Linda Flowers Literary Award is given annually by the Humanities Council for previously unpublished writing that portrays North Carolina, its people, and cultures. While authors do not have to be North Carolinians, entries are expected to draw on North Carolina connections and/or memories.

The North Carolina Humanities Council invites nominations for Humanities Council trustees. Candidates must be North Carolina residents committed to advancing the Humanities Council’s mission to serve as an advocate for lifelong learning and thoughtful dialogue about all facets of human life and to facilitate the exploration and celebration of the many voices and stories of North Carolina’s cultures and heritage.

RiddleFest, presented annually by Traditional Voices Group, honors native son and musician Lesley Riddle, who played a critical role in the development and early practice of American country music. This year's celebration, June 21 and 22, focuses on railroad and work songs of the southern Appalachian Mountains through a variety of programs and performances in Burnsville NC and at the Historic Orchard at Altapass off the Blue Ridge Parkway near Spruce Pine.

GREENSBORO, NC (June 4, 2014) – Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America, a Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition presented by the North Carolina Humanities Council, the Smithsonian Institution, and rural communities statewide, begins a year-long tour throughout North Carolina in February 2015.

The six Hometown Teams host sites include