Welcome to the North Carolina Humanities Council

Since 1972 the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has made the humanities a comerstone of public life. Take a look at what the Humanities Council offers your community, use the calendar to locate an event, consider applying for a grant, or contact the staff to find out where and how the Council is at work across the state.

By: Maria Henson

For those who are fans of Provost Emeritus Ed Wilson (’43) — and there are legions — you missed a happy gathering of Ed and friends a few weeks ago at the Porter Byrum Welcome Center on campus. You would have had to squeeze in for the event at which the North Carolina Humanities Council bestowed the John Tyler Caldwell Award for the Humanities on the man known as “Mr. Wake Forest.”

It is an honor to be a part of this celebration of Ed Wilson’s life as a teacher, a university provost, and an advocate for the humanities, both within the university and outside it.

Good morning and thank you for the generous introduction and warm welcome.

I’d like to begin by thanking the Federation for the invitation to attend the conference and to speak to you this morning. I’ve learned a lot over the past few days, and I value this opportunity to talk about the humanities and about my hopes for the NEH.

On Saturday, November 22 in the Pate Room of the Cumberland County Public Library in Fayetteville, the Museum of the Cape Fear, one of seven museums within the Division of State History Museums, will sponsor and present a half-day mini-symposium from 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm, celebrating the 225th anniversary of North Carolina’s ratification of the United States Constitution by examining the two major events leading to the ratification, as well as providing social context of North

On Thursday, October 30, 2014, at 7:00PM at the Porter Byrum Welcome Center on the campus of Wake Forest University, Edwin Graves Wilson will receive the North Carolina Humanities Council’s highest honor, the John Tyler Caldwell Award for the Humanities. The award recognizes Wilson for his lifelong achievements as an advocate for the public humanities across North Carolina. The Caldwell Award ceremony is free and open to the public.

Dr. Elliot Engel, a frequent guest lecturer at Davie County Public Library, is a scholar, performer, and storyteller whose infectious enthusiasm and radiant wit create an imaginative and delightful presentation. Using anecdotes, analysis, and large doses of humor, he gives new insights into the backgrounds, lives, and accomplishments of the great masters of literature, culture, and fine arts.