Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

These speakers bring the public a variety of presentations which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

How to Apply to be a Host Site:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars program guidelines under "How to Apply" on this                  website or download them here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and                         speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the requested 

STEP 4: Complete and submit the Road Scholars Program Host Site Application at                   least 60 days prior to your intended event date.

Through this program participating scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures with our communities. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

If you would like more information on applying to host a Road Scholars presentation please contact the Program Coordinator, Caitlin Patton, at cpatton@nchumanities.org or (704) 687-1521.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

This presentation can be adapted to interest. Parable and teaching stories from Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism can be used (A) to explore one of the faiths, or (B) to compare two of the traditions. A gentle and respectful...

In this presentation audiences will be drawn in to the story of the American Revolution in the south. The talk on this campaign can focus on three principle areas from Jones’ book Before they were Heroes at King’s Mountain:

1....

            More than 10,000 German prisoners of war were interned in eighteen camps in North Carolina during World War II. Yet apart from the guards, civilian workers, and FBI and...

These presentations will introduce the personal narratives, letters, poetry, and interviews of North Carolina slaves and discuss how these works fill in a lost or often distorted picture of slavery in our state before the Civil War. The...

Much has been said, and is currently being said about climate change. Opponents of taking action claim they have valid scientific evidence that refutes humans are causing what we are witnessing in our climate today. This presentation...

Confederate NC was a complex and contradictory place. Among the last to secede, the state ultimately provided more soldiers than any other to the Confederate Army. Governor Zebulon Vance was an outspoken proponent of secession, but...

Over the last 40 years, the South has experienced social and economic change at a dizzying pace. During this period, the South was transformed from a poor region that was still in many respects “the Nation’s number one economic problem...

The European conquest remains the most destructive event inflicted on Africa’s native people. However, the sudden departure of these same colonial powers was nearly as devastating. Artificially created nations replaced weakened tribal...

About every 30 years, some scholar “discovers” George Moses Horton, the first black man to publish a book while living as a slave. Usually, the new fame is short lived. Marjorie Hudson, whose farm is within five miles of Horton’s...

Coming-of-Age stories are regarded by some as quintessentially American, and few have succeeded as well as Harper Lee and James Agee. Both offer compelling approaches to the Southern narrative.