Road Scholars

Road Scholars

As of July 14, 2020, the North Carolina Humanities Council retired the Road Scholars program.

The North Carolina Humanities Council thanks the many scholars who participated in this program and those who attended and supported this program with their gifts.

We believe that knowledge builds community and through our grant programs we will continue to embolden and encourage public humanities scholars and community organizations to work together to reimagine and create new public humanities programs that are community centric. Click here for more information and to learn if you are eligible for North Carolina Humanities Council grant opportunities.

If you have questions about scholar resources please contact our Executive Director, Sherry Paula Watkins at spwatkins@nchumanities.org and cc Executive Assistant Megan Byrd at mbyrd@nchumanities.org.

COVID-19 Update:  

Unfortunately, due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic the Council has canceled all Road Scholar Speakers Bureau events through October 31, 2020 and will not be offering rescheduling options. We recognize the difficulties that may result from canceled events and appreciate your flexibility, cooperation and understanding.

 

From 1990-2020 the North Carolina Humanities Council supported public humanities lectures for adults through our Road Scholars Speakers Bureau

Our Road Scholars program catalog explored the nuances of identity and community with presentations by over 60 speakers which focused on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Some lectures focused on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examined broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explored the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by hosts of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Why is there such a large group of Cherokees in western North Carolina? Why weren’t they removed with the over 16,000 Cherokees that were moved to Indian Territory in the 1830s? This program looks at the origin and legal basis of the...

While the greater part of Robert E.

Southern cuisine is a blending of the culinary traditions and ingredients of three primary groups: Native Americans, and immigrants from the British Isles and West and Central Africa. This “blend” has resulted in a “core” cuisine in the...

In this presentation McNeill uses the piano to trace changes in the American national character through a variety of songs from the 19th century to the present. He celebrates the time when the piano was once the hub and hearth of the...

Southern stories are more than tangled tales of honeysuckle and kudzu. The thirteen states that comprise the Old South have collectively produced some of the nation’s finest writers and the past century’s most honored books.

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This lecture describes the history of ground transportation in the southeast during Colonial times. The transition from subsistence to market economies in the southern backcountry was reflected in commercial transportation processes...

For more than 450 years, shipwrecks shaped the destiny of NC’s Outer Banks, creating one of the most intriguing histories and cultures in America. Kevin Duffus, author of the 2007 book Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks

With historic photographs, drawings and maps, maritime historian Kevin Duffus presents a wide-ranging discussion of North Carolina's rich heritage of guiding mariners, a tradition which surprisingly began nearly five centuries ago.Learn...

King Arthur, in the musical Camelot, heralds "Don't let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief, shining moment, that was known as Camelot."

African Americans have played an integral role in the creation and development of the United States from the colonial period to the present.  Since 1619 when the first twenty Africans were brought to the shores of the Chesapeake to...