Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

This year's catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

This new listing of speakers brings to the public a variety of presentations that explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust.

Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

The scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

India has a unique cultural and spiritual history dating back five millennia. It is a multi-religious, multi-lingual, and multi-party democratic country. Knowledge of the culture of India is particularly important to the people of North...

Original, unpublished documents and correspondence from gifted Sandhills women provide unique and fascinating perspectives of the beginning, middle, and end of the Civil War period in North Carolina. An initially uplifting, idealistic...

During the 20th century, North Carolina poets recorded in verse many of the crucial perceptions, dreams, experiences, and concerns which swirled about them. From profound social issues to the quietest personal moments, from...

This lecture attempts to define the role of the Black church in three works by Ernest J. Gaines: A Lesson Before Dying, A Gathering of Old Men, and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. The church has traditionally been cast...

Coming-of-Age stories are regarded by some as quintessentially American, and few have succeeded as well as Harper Lee and James Agee. Both offer compelling approaches to the Southern narrative.

We know of the great migration of Black farmers to major northern cities earlier in the twentieth century. Now, in a reverse migration, there is an emerging North Carolina Black middle class made up of the children and grandchildren of...

At the entrance to the North Carolina Court of Appeals building is an imposing statue, dating from 1914, of Thomas Ruffin, chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court from 1833 to 1855. Roscoe Pound considered Ruffin one of the ten...

These presentations will introduce the personal narratives, letters, poetry, and interviews of North Carolina slaves and discuss how these works fill in a lost or often distorted picture of slavery in our state before the Civil War. The...

The history of NC's textile industry includes jobs migration, labor unions, and globalization, all of which parallel manufacturing industries throughout the world today. This program focuses on NC's rich textile heritage as told...

Kwanzaa, an African American and Pan African holiday, was created in 1966 by Dr.