Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

This year's catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

This new listing of speakers brings to the public a variety of presentations that explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust.

Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

The scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

This program examines the life and career of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Douglas Southall Freeman within the context of the southern intellectual community of the early twentieth century. Freeman’s work as editor of the Richmond ...

The title of this program is taken from one of Joseph Bathanti’s essays, which traces his journey of 20 years, literally and spiritually, from growing up in a large, northern city to becoming a citizen of the rural South. Bathanti reads...

The Best of Simple, Langston Hughes' stories about Jesse B. Semple, demonstrates the value and power of writing and telling what you know through observations. Semple editorializes about such topics as race, love, and...

In this program, Dr. Fasih Ahmed describes the demographics, geography, and cultures of Islamic societies and analyzes the diverse political and social systems in Muslim countries. He also presents a brief history of US relations with...

In this presentation, Douglas Jackson gives a historical perspective on the Central Interscholastic Athletic Association, formerly the Colored Interscholastic Athletic Association. Included are examinations of how local and regional...

In a people’s war, such as the American Civil War, many men with no professional military training rose to positions of high command. Many of these so-called citizen soldiers did not measure up to the challenges of command. One...

With historic and present day photos and excerpts from the region’s writers of poetry, fiction, plays and memoir, Georgann Eubanks serves as energetic guide on a tour of the North Carolina mountains as revealed through its...

Amid the strife and upheaval in the American South of the 1920s, the 1929 Loray Mill Strike in Gastonia serves as an emblem of the violent textile labor disputes of the time. During this calamitous period, textile worker Ella May...

In twentieth century America, volumes have been written about art with discussions of craft often an afterthought. For those whose primary interest is focused on three-dimensional objects, there is no specific language or system of...

At the entrance to the North Carolina Court of Appeals building is an imposing statue, dating from 1914, of Thomas Ruffin, chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court from 1833 to 1855. Roscoe Pound considered Ruffin one of the ten...