Road Scholars

Road Scholars

As of July 14, 2020, the North Carolina Humanities Council retired the Road Scholars program.

The North Carolina Humanities Council thanks the many scholars who participated in this program and those who attended and supported this program with their gifts.

We believe that knowledge builds community and through our grant programs we will continue to embolden and encourage public humanities scholars and community organizations to work together to reimagine and create new public humanities programs that are community centric. Click here for more information and to learn if you are eligible for North Carolina Humanities Council grant opportunities.

If you have questions about scholar resources please contact our Executive Director, Sherry Paula Watkins at spwatkins@nchumanities.org and cc Executive Assistant Megan Byrd at mbyrd@nchumanities.org.

COVID-19 Update:  

Unfortunately, due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic the Council has canceled all Road Scholar Speakers Bureau events through October 31, 2020 and will not be offering rescheduling options. We recognize the difficulties that may result from canceled events and appreciate your flexibility, cooperation and understanding.

 

From 1990-2020 the North Carolina Humanities Council supported public humanities lectures for adults through our Road Scholars Speakers Bureau

Our Road Scholars program catalog explored the nuances of identity and community with presentations by over 60 speakers which focused on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Some lectures focused on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examined broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explored the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by hosts of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

The First Amendment of the United State Constitution provides a guarantee of freedom of speech, however, some of the great titles in American literature have been censored including books by Mark Twain, (Huckleberry Finn), J. D...

King Arthur, in the musical Camelot, heralds "Don't let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief, shining moment, that was known as Camelot."

Over the last 40 years, the South has experienced social and economic change at a dizzying pace. During this period, the South was transformed from a poor region that was still in many respects “the Nation’s number one economic problem...

Orphan Trains resettled some 250,000 children from crowded eastern cities to rural areas of the United States from 1853 to 1929. The program, though well-intentioned, was not without its critics.

A lifelong history buff and...

Billy Stevens demonstrates the impact of Negro spirituals on American popular music with a fascinating journey spanning a century of American history. Using archival recordings of two songs based on the biblical story of Samson and...

At dawn on September 22, 1711, over five hundred Tuscarora, Core, Neuse, Pamlico, Weetock, Machapunga, and Bear River Indian warriors swept down on the unsuspecting settlers living along Neuse and...

Much has been said, and is currently being said about climate change. Opponents of taking action claim they have valid scientific evidence that refutes humans are causing what we are witnessing in our climate today. This presentation...

This program examines the life of James Longstreet, who, despite his stellar record as a corps commander in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, became one of the most vilified figures in the postbellum South. How much of the...

Riverton, ancestral home of poet John Charles McNeill and historian Gerald Johnson, near Wagram in Scotland county, is not a “place but a state of mind.” Tradition abounds in this tiny Scottish settlement on the banks of the Lumbee...

Nowhere is the rich cultural diversity of the American South more evident than in its music. From the high, lonesome sound emanating from Appalachian hollers to the “lowdown shaking chill” of blues performers in Delta juke joints,...