Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 60 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars Program Guidelines for details on eligibility and expectations for host sites. Common program FAQs are listed here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. Please note, the Council is currently only accepting applications for events taking place between 11/1/19-10/31/20.

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions. Need a refresher on how to navigate your Applicant Dashboard? Click here for a video tour!

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below. We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and reports.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. You can watch this video to learn the steps to creating your account. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2020 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/19-10/31/20)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. You can watch this video to learn how to complete the online application form. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2020 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/19-10/31/20)" and complete the form.
  • New applicant? Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one phone consultations with Programs Coordinator Melissa Giblin to discuss the program and application process. Please click here to schedule a phone consultation.  

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Why are North Carolinians called Tar Heels? This history program examines the practices and context of the North Carolina naval stores industry from its beginnings in 1705 through its decline in 1950. Brayan Avery and a team of...

Douglas Jackson will examine the performance practices of trumpet and cornet jazz stylists in this presentation. Historical perspectives will be emphasized, along with demonstrations of the instruments by the presenter. The program...

"The people we study in history were once as alive as we are this very minute." Nothing holds truer than the 2228 stories to be found on the RMS Titanic. This presentation is a glimpse into the world of 1912 and the amazing people who...

For centuries North Carolinians have attempted to simplify race by creating three broad categories--Native American, Black and Whites However, during the colonial and antebellum periods many Native, Black and White communities contained...

There are approximately seven million Muslims in the United States. These men and women come from all walks of life and from a range of ethnic and racial backgrounds. This presentation will help audiences better understand Islam in all...

Scott Mason may have the best job in television. He travels all over North Carolina, usually steering clear of highways and bounding instead along bumpy roads and off-beaten paths. He uncovers hidden gems everywhere he goes: people and...

This program examines the life of James Longstreet, who, despite his stellar record as a corps commander in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, became one of the most vilified figures in the postbellum South. How much of the...

Gerald White Johnson (1890-1980), born in Riverton (near Wagram in Scotland County), was a giant among American scholars, friend and colleague of famous author H.L.

Though they have often been silent, NC women who have been on strike have powerful stories to tell. Their voices are rarely heard in a state that has consistently maintained the lowest rate of unionism. These women worked in textiles...

This lecture describes the history of ground transportation in the southeast during Colonial times. The transition from subsistence to market economies in the southern backcountry was reflected in commercial transportation processes...