Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

This listing of speakers brings to the public a variety of presentations that explore the nuances of identity and community. Some of them start in North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Others discuss the legacies of historical events including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust.

Some explore the history and techniques of art, from Latin American music to North Carolina crafts. Others widen perspectives on a variety of literary genres, including poetry, autobiography, and oral history.

The scholars explore the celebrations and struggles of race relations, the experiences of immigrants, the stories of women in untraditional roles, and the lives and works of historical figures. They discuss ways to use literature, music, and art as cultural expression, and they contemplate the need for educational reform. These presentations span past and present, factual history and timeless theory, and traditional and innovative interpretations of our literary canons.

If you would like more information on how to apply to host a Road Scholars program please visit our "Requesting a Program FAQs" tab. You can also download an application here.

 

 

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Why is there such a large group of Cherokees in western North Carolina? Why weren’t they removed with the over 16,000 Cherokees that were moved to Indian Territory in the 1830s? This program looks at the origin and legal basis of the...

This presentation looks at the past, present and future of what has become known as Roots music in the United States. The historical origins of various types of music including Blues, Folk, Country and Bluegrass, are examined, along...

Thomas Day (1801-ca. 1861) is mostly remembered today by North Carolinians as a furniture maker who had the largest furniture business in the state during the height of slavery. A black artisan and business man, Day’s shop turned...

Prior to 1492, longleaf pine ecosystems covered more than 92 million acres in the southeastern United States. These forests and savannas were ecologically diverse fire ecosystems, a result of lightning and fires intentionally set by...

This lecture is devoted to the artist's unique ability to express himself in several media: tapestry, mosaic, stained glass, lithographs, ceramics, book illustrations and oil paintings. Jacobson has selected ten works, each one a...

In this program, Dr. Fasih Ahmed describes the demographics, geography, and cultures of Islamic societies and analyzes the diverse political and social systems in Muslim countries. He also presents a brief history of US relations with...

Much has been said, and is currently being said about climate change. Opponents of taking action claim they have valid scientific evidence that refutes humans are causing what we are witnessing in our climate today. This presentation...

Coming-of-Age stories are regarded by some as quintessentially American, and few have succeeded as well as Harper Lee and James Agee. Both offer compelling approaches to the Southern narrative.

Cora Wilson Stewart was one of the most widely known authorities on adult illiteracy in the United States during the first third of the twentieth century. Long before it became popular to decry the problem of adult illiteracy, she...

To document and preserve the state’s vanishing rural culture, Bernie Harberts spent four months with a camera and a mule traveling 600 miles from the NC coast to the Great...