Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars Program Guidelines for details on eligibility and expectations for host sites. Common program FAQs are listed here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. Please note, the Council is currently only accepting applications for events taking place 11/1/18-10/31/19.

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions. Need a refresher on how to navigate your Applicant Dashboard? Click here for a video tour!

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below. We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and reports.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. You can watch this video to learn the steps to creating your account. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/18-10/31/19)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. You can watch this video to learn how to complete the online application form. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/18-10/31/19)" and complete the form.
  • New applicant? Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one phone consultations with Programs Coordinator, Melissa Giblin to discuss the program and application process. Please click here to schedule a phone consultation.  

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

In 1839, American author and explorer John Lloyd Stephens undertook an extensive expedition through the Maya region of Central America and Mexico. The resulting publication fascinated the American public and introduced many to the...

This lecture on the windows was first suggested by the parish priest, Klaus Mayer. The windows were designed by Chagall for the apse of the church in 1973 as a sign of love, peace, hope and reconciliation for France and Germany, and for...

This program examines oral traditions in Jaki Shelton Green’s own family through a variety of aspects including sources of transmission and legacy from baptisms to weddings to funerals.

Charles, Lord Cornwallis—the commander of the British Army in the South—built a bonfire in February 1781. Mustering his men from their camp at Ramseur’s Mill in the North Carolina backcountry, he ordered them to burn everything—creature...

: In this program, Dr. Anne Mitchell Whisnant leads audiences on a Blue Ridge Parkway journey different from the one they take either when driving the road or when reading about it.  Going beyond Parkway views, scenery, and...

In the post-Civil War South, North Carolina’s women had an increasing presence in courtrooms. Viewed as dependents and frequently characterized as victims, women were traditionally granted certain protections by the law, including the...

This program examines the life of James Longstreet, who, despite his stellar record as a corps commander in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, became one of the most vilified figures in the postbellum South. How much of the...

During WWII the German navy used a cipher machine called Enigma to encipher and decipher messages. The machine was onboard of the U-85, one of the U-boats operating off the coast of the Outer Banks, and went down with the ship when...

In a people’s war, such as the American Civil War, many men with no professional military training rose to positions of high command. Many of these so-called citizen soldiers did not measure up to the challenges of command. One...

Although most people are familiar with how the Native Americans adopted white man’s culture and became Americanized, many are not aware of what we borrowed from the Indians. Native Americans affected virtually every aspect of...