Road Scholars

Road Scholars

The North Carolina Humanities Council has been offering speakers, free of charge, to public audiences since 1990. All presentations are grounded in the humanities.

Our catalog of Road Scholars includes over 70 speakers whose lectures focus on issues of history, literature, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, linguistics, jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts, sociology, and certain aspects of social science.

Through this program, the Council supports public humanities lectures which explore the nuances of identity and community. Some lectures focus on North Carolina, revisiting rural farm life, regional folklore, oral histories, the dynamics of ethnic populations throughout the state, and the history of local traditions. Other lectures examine broad national and regional historical legacies including the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Holocaust. Still others explore the theory and history of art, from North Carolina crafts to literary works, including poetry, and the classics.

How to Apply for Funding to Host a Road Scholars Event:

STEP 1: Review the Road Scholars Program Guidelines for details on eligibility and expectations for host sites. Common program FAQs are listed here.

STEP 2: Review the Road Scholars Speakers Web-Catalog to select a topic and speaker for your organization.

STEP 3: Contact your selected scholar to choose a date and time for the event. Please note, the Council is currently only accepting applications for events taking place 11/1/18-10/31/19.

STEP 4: Watch this video Tutorial on how to apply using our online application system or download these instructions. Need a refresher on how to navigate your Applicant Dashboard? Click here for a video tour!

STEP 5: At least 60 days prior to the intended Road Scholars event date submit your online application according to options A and B below. We strongly recommend that you bookmark the login page for easy access to your application and reports.

  • A. If you are new to the online system, please create an account prior to applying. You can watch this video to learn the steps to creating your account. Once you have created your account and are logged in to your Applicant Dashboard, click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/18-10/31/19)" and completed the form. 
  • B. If you have previously created an account, please click here to login. You can watch this video to learn how to complete the online application form. Once on your Applicant Dashboard click "Apply" in the upper left-hand corner to view an alphabetical list of all open Council opportunities. Scroll down and select "2019 Road Scholars Program Events (11/1/18-10/31/19)" and complete the form.
  • New applicant? Still have questions? We are here to help! We offer one-on-one phone consultations with Programs Coordinator, Melissa Giblin to discuss the program and application process. Please click here to schedule a phone consultation.  

Please note: The application you submit to the Council is a funding request ONLY. You must connect with a selected scholar prior to applying for funding to select a date and time for the intended event.

Please note: The views and opinions expressed by sponsors of and participants in our programs, including our Roads Scholars programs, are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the North Carolina Humanities Council.

This lecture describes the history of ground transportation in the southeast during Colonial times. The transition from subsistence to market economies in the southern backcountry was reflected in commercial transportation processes...

During WWII the German navy used a cipher machine called Enigma to encipher and decipher messages. The machine was onboard of the U-85, one of the U-boats operating off the coast of the Outer Banks, and went down with the ship when...

In this presentation by history educator Laurel Sneed, the audience will learn about three courageous African American Tar Heels who escaped to freedom and authored slave narratives: Harriet Jacobs, of Edenton; Moses Roper, of Caswell...

At dawn on September 22, 1711, over five hundred Tuscarora, Core, Neuse, Pamlico, Weetock, Machapunga, and Bear River Indian warriors swept down on the unsuspecting settlers living along Neuse and...

This presentation will address the impact tobacco had in forming a new American society, especially in the pre-colonial, colonial, antebellum and post Civil War periods, and into the twentieth century. It will include a verbal...

We know of the great migration of Black farmers to major northern cities earlier in the twentieth century. Now, in a reverse migration, there is an emerging North Carolina Black middle class made up of the children and grandchildren of...

Nowhere is the rich cultural diversity of the American South more evident than in its music. From the high, lonesome sound emanating from Appalachian hollers to the “lowdown shaking chill” of blues performers in Delta juke joints,...

Southern cuisine is a blending of the culinary traditions and ingredients of three primary groups: Native Americans, and immigrants from the British Isles and West and Central Africa. This “blend” has resulted in a “core” cuisine in the...

In the seventeenth century, King Louis XIV gave orphan girls a dowry to help populate New France.  The girls became known as "les filles du roi," or the king's daughters.  Women, including Marguerite Bourgeoys, Jeanne Mance,...

Prior to 1492, longleaf pine ecosystems covered more than 92 million acres in the southeastern United States. These forests and savannas were ecologically diverse fire ecosystems, a result of lightning and fires intentionally set by...